Another way to develop innovation policy? Blog #12

17, October, 2017 – BLOG #12

Another way to develop innovation policy?

At a meeting I was at recently, Gandeephan Ganeshalingam, the Chief Innovation Officer for GE Canada, described their view of the business environment using the acronym “VUCA”.  This stands for volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous. This is clearly a very challenging environment in which to operate.

Now think about how innovation policy has traditionally been developed.  Often there is a commission (such as the Jenkins Report, that studied Federal support for research and development) that studies an issue, and issues a report with recommendation.  This is often followed by extensive period of consultation with various stakeholders.  Then a policy is announced, sometimes legislation is proposed, and then the policy is implemented.  This process often takes many months if not years.

So how likely is it that an innovation policy will work for a company in a VUCA world? Good question!

There is another way to develop innovation policy. In recent years a movement has started (particularly in the UK) to use an experimental approach based on small randomized controlled trials.  The approach is straightforward:

  • Set up pilots to experiment with new programs. One randomly selected group gets the new program, another randomly selected group doesn’t.
  • Evaluate them using rigorous methods.
  • Scale up those that work, stop those that don’t work.

Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have been used in a number of policy areas such as development (by the World Bank), education and social policy. They are the gold standard for evaluating new drugs and medical procedures. In all of these areas the link between an intervention and desired outcomes is uncertain because no adequate theory exists. RCT’s provide empirical evidence whether an intervention actually works or not, and provide a strong evidence base for a new policy.  As one of the reports says, it replaces reliance on ‘eminence, charisma, and personal experience’ with evidence of what actually works.

RCTs haven’t been used much for developing innovation or entrepreneurship policy, but there is a large potential for exploring its use in those fields.

RCTs, like all new tools, have their strengths and limitations, and require expertise to be used effectively. They won’t be used across the board, just in a few selected areas. A key strength is that they can provide empirical evidence for a new policy, and minimize influences of ideology or history.  One weakness is that they don’t explain why an intervention works, only if it does or not.

It is interesting to note that when randomized controlled trials were introduced in medicine, they were strongly opposed by some clinicians, many of whom believed that their personal expert judgement was sufficient to decide whether a particular treatment was effective or not.  However randomized controlled trials are now regarded as the gold standard for medical evaluations.

Nesta – a UK charity that supports innovation – has developed an introductory guide for using randomized controlled trials. It is available at http://www.nesta.org.uk/publications/running-randomised-controlled-trials-innovation-entrepreneurship-and-growth

Governments at all levels in Canada spend a great deal of money supporting innovation and entrepreneurship. Randomized controlled trials can be another tool in the tool kit to make sure that we get the best possible outcomes. There is very significant expertise in the medical community to draw on to assist this endeavor.

Peter Josty

p.josty@thecis.ca
403-249-0191
www.thecis.ca

 

 


Entrepreneurship in Alberta – Blog 11

26, September, 2017 – BLOG #11

Entrepreneurship in Alberta

Entrepreneurship is alive and well in Alberta, according to the latest GEM (Global Entrepreneurship Monitor) report, just issued by THECIS.  Over 17% of the adult population is engaged in early stage entrepreneurship, a higher rate than in the US, Australia and all other advanced countries.  Women are very active in early stage entrepreneurship, at 80% of the men’s rate, also higher than the US.

Consumer services is the most popular field, with just more than  50% of ventures, followed  by business oriented services at 30% and manufacturing at 20%. Age is an important determinant of entrepreneurial activity, with higher rates in the 18-24 and 25-34 age groups. Overall, however, about half of new ventures are led by people aged 18-34, and half by those aged 35-64. Above age 65 the rate drops off, but still 4% of older Albertans are active as entrepreneurs.

Education is also a key determinant of entrepreneurship. As people acquire more education they become more entrepreneurial.  The highest rate of entrepreneurship is found among those with post graduate education.

The Alberta population is very supportive of entrepreneurship, with  60%–70% of respondents believe that entrepreneurship is a good career choice that successful entrepreneurs have high social status, and that media provide favorable coverage of entrepreneurship.

About 15% of startups are highly innovative, having no direct competitors.  About 40% of startups are in sectors with many competitors.

Experts were asked to evaluate the Alberta ecosystem by rating nine relevant factors. The five with the best scores were: physical infrastructure, commercial infrastructure, social and cultural norms, government programs, and government policy at neutral.  The lower five in decreasing order were post-secondary education at neutral, R&D transfer (to small and growing firms), internal market dynamics, finance, and primary and secondary education. The experts were also asked to rate to biggest constraints and fostering factors. The most mentioned constraints were finance as the top priority with capacity for entrepreneurship and government policy as next areas of priority.

The most mentioned fostering factors were  cultural and social norms as highest priority with the economic climate and, surprisingly, the low rated question of education and training as second and third areas of priority.

The report had five recommendations:

  1. Creative government programs are needed to support entrepreneurship that has promise to create new directions. This needs to involve all departments of governments, not only those with responsibility for small business.
  2. School systems need to examine the opportunities to promote entrepreneurial thinking in the context of education aimed at encouraging independence and creativity.
  3. Despite the evidence that entrepreneurship by women in Alberta is stronger than in other parts of the country or in other developed countries, a gap remains and attitude and motivation data indicate that women still have less confidence in skills and  knowledge and women entrepreneurs have more complex motivations. Information programs and mentorship for women remain a priority.
  4. With the low rate of seniors’ entrepreneurship and the expected increase in size of this demographic in better health in the future, consider targeting entrepreneurship programs at older Albertans.
  5. Data show rates of entrepreneurship rise with increase of educational experience. Education for entrepreneurial thinking should be promoted across all types of secondary and post-secondary programs.

The full report is available at www.gemcanada.org

Peter Josty

p.josty@thecis.ca
403-249-0191
www.thecis.ca


Entrepreneurship in Alberta – GEM Alberta 2016 Report

GEM Alberta 2016 Report

Entrepreneurship in Alberta- The latest GEM Report

 

Speaker: Cooper Langford, University of Calgary

The Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) is the largest study of entrepreneurship in the world. This presentation describes the latest GEM Alberta report and compares entrepreneurship in Alberta with other Canadian provinces and 60 other countries.  The report takes a comprehensive look at the aspirations, attitudes and activities of entrepreneurs in Alberta and how Alberta compares with other jurisdictions. The study also identifies some of the strengths and weaknesses of the Alberta innovation system. This is the fourth GEM Report on entrepreneurship in Alberta

Time & Location
Time:  9:00-10:00 am
Date: Thursday October 12th 2017.
Place:  Innovate Calgary,  3553 31 Street NW,  Calgary, Boardroom 2/3

Cost
Ticket: Free

Registration
By Phone: 403-968-3722 or 1-877-877-1055 [toll free anywhere in Alberta]
By Email: Martha@thecis.ca

 


Invitation to Participate: Exploring the needs and interests of Canadian Entrepreneurs Age 50+

“The Centre for Elder Research, Sheridan College, Oakville, Ontario is conducting a nation-wide study to help us to learn more about new and established Canadian entrepreneurs age 50+ as well as those individuals 50+ who are actively pursuing a defined business idea. The study is funded by the Canadian Education and Research Institute for Counselling (CERIC).

If you are a Canadian entrepreneur age 50+, you are invited to complete the survey and may do so by clicking on the following link. Please note that the survey is available in both English and French.”

English

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/Entrepreneurs50PlusInCanada

French

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/EntrepreneursCanadiens50plus

 


THECIS Cumulative Projects

Project List as of January 2017

 

Global Entrepreneurship Monitor [GEM] project. 2013-2015

THECIS took the lead to create a cross Canada team and secure funding for GEM studies in Canada as well as in BC, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec and Newfoundland. This project will produce 20 GEM reports when completed:

  • Canada – three reports
  • Alberta – three reports
  • Ontario – three reports
  • Quebec – three reports
  • British Columbia – one report
  • Saskatchewan – one report
  • Manitoba – one report
  • Newfoundland – one report
  • Nova Scotia – one report
  • Atlantic Canada (four provinces) – one report
  • Women’s entrepreneurship – one report
  • Entrepreneurship at the university of Calgary – one report

 

Nanotechnology Road Map implementation project, starting summer 2012

A best practice for developing road maps is to spend the time necessary once the road map is completed taking it to all the main stakeholders and interest groups to secure their understanding and buy in for the Road Map.

 

Nanotechnology Roadmapping project, 2011-2012

Following on from the previous project, nanoAlberta has asked us to develop road maps for the most promising applications for nanotechnology in Alberta. This involves a collaborative effort among all the stakeholders, in industry, government, university and NGOs.

 

Impact of nanotechnology in Alberta, 2010/2011

NanoAlberta asked us to identify the major applications for nanotechnology likely to have commercial impact by 2020 and to develop a road map and action plan for realizing the benefits to Alberta.

 

InnoWest 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009 and 2010

InnoWest is the western Canadian Innovation Conference. THECIS has organised this event since 2004, and it has become an annual event, with steadily increasing attendance from across western Canada and beyond.

 

Science to Society Workshop 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009 and 2010

This event is organised to provide business information to 50- 70 graduate students in science, engineering ICT, health and agriculture. It takes place at a weekend on October in Banff.  Support has come from iCORE, Alberta Ingenuity, AHFMR, the Alberta Agricultural Research Institute, NSERC Prairies and the governments of Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba.

Ingenuity 601 [Graduate Innovation Course], 2007, 2008, 2009 and 2010

This project, carried out for Alberta Ingenuity, is to develop and deliver a learning experience to graduate students in Alberta to acquaint them with the basics of business concepts and give them experience working on  a business related project in a multidisciplinary environment.  The delivery of the Course in the Fall of 2007 is supported by the CRTCAC  [Calgary Regional Technology Commercialization Advisory Committee] and in 2010 by Alberta Innovates – Technology Futures.

 

Health Research Translation Project, 2009

This course is modelled on Ingenuity 601 but targeted at graduate students in medical, health and biosciences and related fields such as medicine, nursing, rehabilitation, life sciences and biomedical engineering. The course is supported by CRTCAC  [Calgary Regional Technology Commercialization Advisory Committee and AHFMR

 

Second Banff Innovation Summit, 2008

The theme of the second Banff Innovation Summit was “The resource industries as engines of economic diversification”. The Summit took place in September, with about 30 senior individuals from industry, government and university from the four western provinces. The Summit was supported by Western Economic Diversification, the Alberta government, iCORE and NSERC Prairies.

 

Pathways Project, 2008

Industry Canada asked us to review the various pathways that knowledge travels from university to business in Canada, and provide examples of each type of pathway identified.

 

International Comparison Review, 2008

This project developed an analysis of the policies being pursued in different countries to encourage industry-university collaboration; assessed the various strengths and weaknesses of various national approached; provided a critical assessment of the organizational structures of universities that underpin university-industry collaboration; and identified best practices and principles. This was for Industry Canada.

 

ICT Sector Performance in Alberta, 2007/2008

This project, supported by Alberta Advanced Education and Technology, is a follow on from the Alberta Innovation Scorecard project. It aims to answer two questions: How is the ICT sector performing in Alberta?  How is the government doing supporting the sector?

 

Foresight Scoping Workshop, 2007

This was a foresight exercise to identify applications that may emerge from the convergence of nano-technology, biotechnology and ICT. It is initiated by the Office of the National Science Advisor and supported by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, the Canadian Biotechnology Secretariat and CMC Microsystems.

University Business Collaboration, 2007

This project is a critical review of the literature on how university researchers collaborate with industrial firms, and how those relationships can result in commercial products. Supported by Industry Canada.

 

Interprovincial Trade in the Oil and Gas Industry, 2007

The Standards Council of Canada asked us to carry out a project to determine if there were any barriers to interprovincial trade in the oil and gs industry that were caused by standardisation factors.

 

What can we learn from clusters? 2007

This project, for the Alberta ICT Council, aims to identify learnings from the ISRN [Innovation Systems Research Network] research on ICT clusters across Canada which are relevant to the Alberta ICT sector.

 

Saskatchewan Innovation Scorecard 2006

The Saskatchewan Innovation Scorecard project was funded by the Saskatchewan government, Western Economic Diversification and NRC-IRAP. It aims to portray the state of innovation in Saskatchewan and compare it with benchmark jurisdictions.

 

First Banff Innovation Summit  2006

The goal of turning Western Canada into a dynamic, diversified and internationally competitive knowledge-based economy must be supported with policies and strategies that take account of both leading-edge ideas and local knowledge about how to assess and improve innovation performance.

The Banff Innovation Summit brought together 30-40 carefully selected industry, policy and academic stakeholders in economic diversification and innovation will interact with an elite international group of experts who are producing leading-edge ideas and knowledge concerning innovation policy and strategy. A speaker from the OECD in Paris provides the keynote address. The Summit was funded by a number of organisations, including the Governments of Canada, Saskatchewan, Alberta, and BC, and the University of Calgary.

 

Feasibility Study for a Seraphim Fund and Virtual Angel Support System  for Western Canada  2006

One of the problems holding back innovation in western Canada is the shortage of early stage funding. This project addressed that problem by carrying out a feasibility study for a new form of virtual angel network. The project was funded by NRC-IRAP.

 

Alberta Technology Report 2006

THECIS partnered with Ernst and Young and Ipsos Reid to prepare the 2006 edition of the Alberta Technology Report. The project was funded by Alberta Innovation and Science, Western Economic Diversification xxx. It involved a survey of CEOs of high tech firms to identify the state of the sector.

 

University Research Park Vision and Conceptual Masterplan, 2005

THECIS worked with a consortium of firms of architects to develop a Vision and Conceptual master plan for the rejuvenation of the University Research Park. This was done for Calgary Technologies, the University of Calgary and Alberta Infrastructure.

 

Alberta Innovation Scorecard 2005

The Alberta Innovation Scorecard was a direct follow up to the earlier project on developing new economic measures for Alberta. The Alberta Innovation Scorecard was developed using a consultation process with a team from the project sponsors [Western Economic Diversification, Alberta Innovation and Science, and NRC-IRAP]. The Scorecard was released publicly and is available on the THECIS web site.

 

Health Innovation 2005/2007

This project was funded by a private Calgary based Foundation. It was a year long study of the health industry in Alberta, to identify the main characteristics of the industry and celebrate its successes. The results of this work were disseminated across Alberta by a series of workshops in major centres organised by THECIS.

 

Innovation System data Initiative 2005/2006

Policy makers often need better and more timely information than is currently available from Statistics Canada. This project – supported by Alberta Innovation and Science, Western Economic Diversification and NRC-IRAP – addressed this need by sending a graduate student to Ottawa and supervising him to obtain information of value to the project sponsors.

 

Calgary Innovation Clinic 2004

Industry Canada and Western Economic Diversification asked THECIS to organise an Innovation Clinic in Calgary. This involved having two high tech CEOs being interviewed before a live audience to describe the factors leading to their success. The interviews were recorded and have been made available across Canada in DVD format by Industry Canada.

 

Return to Community – the Impact of the University of Calgary on its Community. 2004

The University of Calgary asked THECIS to prepare a report showing the impact the University has on the community. This report was subsequently used in discussions at the university Senate and by other bodies.

 

Feasibility Study for a wet lab facility at the Edmonton Research Park

THECIS was asked to join a consortium of architect firms to prepare a feasibility study for this facility. The main THECIS role related to developing the business case for the facility. Subsequently the facility was approved and is under construction.

 

Annotated Bibliography: Innovation in the Prairie Provinces 2003

Industry Canada in Saskatoon asked THECIS to prepare an annotated bibliography of papers written about innovation in the prairie provinces.

 

External Technology Audit of AACI Program, 2003

The Alberta Energy Research Institute asked THECIS to carry out an external audit of one of their major technology programs to determine how effective they were.

 

New Economic Measures for Alberta 2003

This major project for Alberta Economic Development was to develop a set of metrics to measure the effectiveness of the Provinces new economic development plan. It involved participation of members from several different Alberta ministries.

 

Briefing Paper for a conference on Receptor Capacity 2003

Calgary Technologies asked THECIS to prepare a briefing paper relating to a  Canadian conference on receptor capacity held in Toronto.

 

Paper on Industrial Research, 2002

This project, for Alberta Innovation and Science, was to prepare a paper for discussion at the Ministers of Science and Technology from across Canada.


THECIS Funding

THECIS is funded on a project basis by a variety of organizations.  Since 2001 the following have provided financial support through contracts or grants:

 

Federal Government Departments and Agencies

  • Western Economic Diversification Canada;
  • ACOA  (Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency);
  • Industry Canada – Ottawa;
  • Industry Canada – Saskatoon office;
  • Office of the National Science Advisor [ONSA];
  • ISED (Innovation Science and Economic Development Canada;
  • Canadian Biotechnology Secretariat;
  • Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada;
  • Standards Council of Canada;
  • National Institute of Nanotechnology [NINT];
  • National Research Council –Industrial Research Assistance Program [NRC-IRAP];
  • Federal Partners in Technology Transfer [FPTT];
  • Business Development Bank of Canada; National Science and Engineering Research Council – Prairies Region;
  • International Development Research Centre [IDRC]

 

Provincial Government Departments and Agencies

  • Alberta Economic Development;
  • Alberta Innovates – Technology Futures;
  • Alberta Finance and Enterprise;
  • nanoAlberta;
  • Alberta Innovation and Science;
  • Advanced Education and Technology;
  • Alberta Sustainable Resource Development;
  • Informatics Circle of Research Excellence [iCORE];
  • Alberta Agricultural Research Institute; Alberta Innovates – Health Solutions;
  • Alberta Energy Research Institute;
  • Alberta Research Council;
  • Alberta Ministry of Agriculture Food and Rural Development [AAFRD];
  • British Columbia Ministry of Advanced Education;
  • Saskatchewan Industry and Resources;
  • Enterprise Saskatchewan;
  • Manitoba Science, Technology, Energy and Mines;
  • Government of Newfoundland and Labrador;
  • Government of Ontario;
  • Innovation Saskatchewan

 

Foundations

  • International Health Business Opportunities Conference Foundation
  • Alberta Ingenuity Fund;
  • Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research [AHFMR]
  • Canadian Youth Business Foundation [CYBF];
  • Futurpreneur Canada

 

Other Funders

  • Calgary Technologies Inc.;
  • University of Calgary;
  • Ryerson University
  • TEC Edmonton;
  • The Evidence Network;
  • University of Alberta, Faculty of Extension
  • AVAC Ltd.   Alberta Chamber of Resources;
  • Genome Prairie; Genome Alberta;
  • CMC Microsystems;
  • Pfizer Inc., Nexen Inc.;
  • Merck Frosst Canada Ltd.;
  • Ernst and Young LLP;
  • Alberta Treasury Branches;
  • Institute of Chartered Accountants of Alberta
  • Certified Management Accountants of Alberta;
  • Calgary Regional Technology Commercialization Advisory Committee [CRTCAC]
  • APEGGA Association of Professional Engineers, Geologists and Geophysicists of Alberta;
  • Institute of Chartered Accountants of Alberta
  • University of Manitoba, Stu Clark Centre for Entrepreneurship

 


THECIS Fellows

THECIS has established a network of experts, called THECIS Fellows, to support the work of the Centre. Current members:

Senior Fellow. Richard Hawkins, BA, MA (Simon Fraser), D.Phil. (Sussex)

Richard is a political economist specializing in science, technology and innovation policy and strategy. Currently he is Professor and Canada Research Chair (Tier 1) in Science and Technology Policy in the Science, Technology and Society and Society at the University of Calgary. Prior to this, he was Leader of the Network Economy Programme and later Senior Advisor to the Science, Technology and Innovation Programme at the Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research TNO, one of Europe’s largest contract research laboratories. Previous to this, he was Senior Fellow in the Science Policy Research Unit (SPRU) at the University of Sussex. Before turning his attention to academic and applied research activities he was active professionally in the international music industry.

 

Adam Holbrook, P. Eng.

Adam is an adjunct professor and Associate Director at the Centre for Policy Research on Science and Technology (CPROST), at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, BC. Before joining CPROST in 1995 he was a career civil servant in the federal government of Canada involved in S&T policy issues at the Treasury Board Secretariat and Industry Canada. At CPROST his research activities have centered on the analysis of science, technology and innovative activities in both the public sector and the private sector. He is the leader of a network of researchers in innovation studies in western Canada, and recently edited a book on regional innovation systems in Canada – “Innovation, Institutions and Territory: Regional Innovation Systems in Canada” .

 

Alex Bruton, PhD, P.Eng. MBA

Entrepreneur and educator with 14 years of experience and a passion for innovation and entrepreneurship. Loves teaching and public speaking, and has presented to audiences ranging in size from five to 500 people on over 40 occasions in six countries. Currently leads the development of a university program that provides an entrepreneurial training ground and launch pad for creative 17-30 year old entrepreneurs in all disciplines, and was Vice President at a technology start-up. Brings excellent leadership and people-skills, a strong technical background and experience that includes: strategy development; business model design; business and product planning; facilitation; marketing research; and industry and competitive analyses. Has published 21 papers in the public domain and 19 proprietary technical, concept-of-operations and business reports. Has had his research supported by NSERC on three occasions and by other awards on nine occasions. Co-founded the Innovation Department for a Canadian advanced technology company, has experience in product and project management, and has recruited and developed early-stage teams. Has won and been nominated for several awards for best and most innovative teaching. Recently gave an invited talk at Google Waterloo on “Creating Really Big Value” through entrepreneurship education (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wX2Zht4GJ1c).

 

Arvid Hardin, B.Sc., Ph.D.

Arvid is Principal of Hardin Associates Technology Management, a privately held business providing international management consulting services, economic and investment development, business strategy development, technology strategy and management.  Before that he worked in senior positions in the international petrochemical and energy industries, and in government agencies. Previously he was Assistant Director, Energy R&D, for the Canadian national Energy Program

 

Bob Este

Bob is Business Development Officer for the Institute for Space Imaging Science at the University of Calgary. He is responsible for initiating, shaping and building local, national, and international business networks with SMEs and large industry in the realm of Space Science. Bob is also Project Manager for the Cyber-SKA (Square Kilometer Array) project funded by CANARIE, and is the Canadian SKA Consortium representative for global industry engagement strategy for the international SKA Development Program. Bob has many years of successful international and corporate and business relationship-building experience. Prior to his current role, Bob was founding Deputy Director of the Institute for Biocomplexity and Informatics at the University of Calgary where he shaped Institute policy and carried out Institute strategic planning and operations, establishing a successful advanced biological research facility.

Bob is also a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Calgary where his dissertation examines the architectures of innovation and the philosophy of science. A successful strategist, manager and administrator for more than 25 years, Bob has managed and delivered entire university transfer (1st and 2nd year) management programs, successfully interned and then served as an education authority CEO, invented and taught unique courses in astronomy, robotics and visual language, enjoyed a number of provincial and national secondments, and completed the Aspen Institute’s Executive Leadership Program. Bob has also served in the Faculties of Continuing Education and Engineering at the University of Calgary as an instructor and program and course designer. Bob has authored and presented articles in IEEE and European, Australian and Asian academic, business and military venues addressing the enhancement of conceptual skills in relation to technological innovation and societal change, and is writing three books in these emerging areas of innovation research.

 

Brian Wixted, B Admin, Grad Dip App Sci., Ph.D.

Brian is a Visiting Fellow with CPROST at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver and the founder of Technomics Research. He has degrees in commerce and a Graduate Diploma of Applied Science. During his employment with the Australian Commonwealth Public Service he worked on science, technology and innovation indicators analysis (1989-1995) and agricultural and resources science and innovation policy (1995-2000).  Between 2000 and 2004, Brian was with the AEGIS research centre at the University of Western Sydney, where he was principally responsible for its data analysis of innovation related issues. In 2005 he completed his doctorate, which examined the international linkages between industrial clusters.

 

Bruno Silvestre  B. Eng., M. Eng., D.Phil

Bruno is an industrial engineer specializing in technology and innovation management, strategy and cluster dynamics. He has more than 10 years of direct managerial experience in the energy sector (including oil and gas and electricity) and other resource based sectors. More recently, he worked for a research park and firm incubator involved in a number of high tech start-up projects. Currently, he is Adjunct Professor and Research Associate with the faculty of Business Administration and the Centre for Policy Research on Science and Technology (CPROST) at Simon Fraser University, and Business Development Executive at ELECTROBRAS, the major Brazilian National Electricak Utility.

 

Chad Saunders, MBA, Ph.D.

Chad is an Assistant Professor at the Haskayne School of Business in the area of Management Information Systems and holds a cross-appointment with the Faculty of Medicine’s Department of Community Health Sciences where he is the Research and Innovation lead with the Health Innovation and Information Technology Centre (HiiTeC). Chad’s research interests focus on the impact of information technology on professional practice. In particular, this work considers the implications for design and innovation within a professional environment and the key entrepreneurial activities associated with the use of technology within the professional contexts. His professional experience includes technology benchmarking, commercialization and the strategic deployment of technology to support collaborative research. Chad has published in leading journals including Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, Journal of Business Venturing, IEEE TRansactions on Software Engineering and the Ivey Business Journal.

 

Charles Davis Ph.D.

Charles is the Edward S. Rogers Sr. Research Chair in Media Management and Entrepreneurship, and Associate Dean, Scholarly Research and Creative Activities, Faculty of Communication & Design at Ryerson University in Toronto. I currently teach and conduct research on innovation management and policy. His research interests have to do with product innovation, media audiences, customer value and experiential consumption of media products, innovation in digital experience goods, and labour and entrepreneurial startups in creative industries.

 

Cooper Langford, Ph.D., FRS(Can.)

Cooper is a Professor of Chemistry at the University of Calgary and Director of the Science, Technology and Society Program at the University. He is a former Vice-President (Research) at U of C and a former Director of Physical and Mathematical Sciences at NSERC. He has published on university/industry/government relations, strategic research funding, evaluation of the outcomes of university research, Canadian participation in megascience, and knowledge flows. His current research includes study of regional clusters in innovation.

 

Denzil Doyle, C.M., B.Sc., D.Eng.,F.E.I.C.

Denzil is Chairman of Doyletech Corporation, an Ottawa-based company specializing in providing consulting services to entrepreneurs, investors, policy makers, and economic development authorities. Although trained as an engineer, he has spent most of his career in the business world. From 1963 to 1981, he directed the affairs of Digital Equipment Canada, growing it to annual sales in excess of $160 million.

He formed Doyletech Corporation in 1982, and provided services to all provincial and the federal government. In 1982, he also co-founded Instantel Inc. an Ottawa based supplier of electronic instrumentation.

From 1995 to 2005 he served as Chairman of Alliance Capital ventures Inc. an Ottawa based venture capital firm. He is the author of several business articles and books.

In 2005 he was invested as a Member of the Order of Canada.

 

Don MacLean

Don is an independent consultant based in Ottawa, Canada. His consulting projects typically involve research, analysis and policy development on economic, social and governance issues related to telecommunications, the Internet and ICTs. From 1992-99, he headed the Strategic Planning and External Affairs Unit of the International Telecommunication Union in Geneva, Switzerland. Prior to joining the ITU, he served in a number of senior policy and planning posts in the former Canadian Department of Communications. Mr. MacLean has a B.A. in Economics and Political Science from McGill University and did graduate studies at the Institut d’Etudes Politiques (Paris) and Princeton.

 

Éric Archambault, D.Phil.

Éric is President of Science-Metrix, a Canadian consultancy that specializes in the measurement and evaluation of science- and technology-related activities. His core function in the company is to analyze and formulate science, technology and innovation policy and strategy. He also teaches quantitative methods (scientometrics and technometrics) to students in the Science, Technology and Society program at the Université du Québec à Montréal and is an associate researcher at the Observatoire des sciences et des technologies as well as at the Centre interuniversitaire de recherche sur la science et la technologie. He has research expertise in the following areas: health science and technology, information and communication technology, energy and transport.

 

Geoff Gregson, LLM, MBA, Ph.D.

Geoff  is the JR Shaw Research Chair in New Venture and Entrepreneurship at the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology (NAIT) in Edmonton, AB and is Associate Dean, Research in the JR Shaw School of Business. He holds PhD in Management, LLM in Intellectual Property Law and MSc in Social Science from the University of Edinburgh (UK), MBA from the Haskayne School of Business, University of Calgary and BPE from the University of Alberta. Geoff has led projects funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), British Academy, Technology Strategy Board, Scottish Executive, Marie Curie (European Commission) and Santander Bank.

His areas of research cover entrepreneurship, technology commercialization, SME growth, innovation (strategy, systems, policy and evaluation) and equity risk capital. Geoff holds a number of external appointments that include Canadian ambassador for the Regional Studies Association (RSA) and Visiting Researcher with the Institute for the Study of Science, Technology & Innovation (ISSTI) at the University of Edinburgh. Prior to joining NAIT, he was a director of the Centre for Entrepreneurship Research at the University of Edinburgh.


Ian McCarthy
, B.Eng., M.Sc., Ph.D.

Ian is currently Canada Research Chair in Management of Technology at the Faculty of Business, Simon Fraser University in Vancouver. His academic career began in engineering where he researched and taught engineering management and operations systems design. Since completing his PhD he has concentrated on  understanding the various operational and technological configurations (practices, processes and structures) that exists in different types of industrial organizations. This has included research on managing operational complexity, mass customization, decision making in new product development, and strategies for drug discovery.

 

Gordon A. Gow  Ph.D.

Gordon is Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Extension at the University of Alberta.   From 2003-2006 he was a Lecturer in the Department of Media and Communications at the London School of Economics and Political, where he was Director of the Graduate Programme in Media and Communications Regulation and Policy.  Gordon’s research looks at the development of electronic communications networks from a combined social and technical perspective, with the aim of promoting innovation through expanded public understanding of and participation in policymaking.  His primary focus is with the long term planning and management of critical infrastructure systems, especially those that support public alerting and emergency management activities.  He is currently involved in the development and testing of an all-hazards warning system in Sri Lanka, in addition to having published reports for the Canadian government on tsunami warning and emergency communications.  His wider research interests include innovation in mobile voice and data systems, especially with respect to regulatory concerns such as spectrum policy and management, telecom reform, technical standardization, and public safety.

 

Jacek Warda, M.A. Economics, D.P.A.

Since 2003 Jacek has been President and Founder of JPW Innovation Associates Inc, a research and advisory practice specializing in science and technology policy. He is a internationally recognized expert on the R&D tax treatment and consultant to the OECD. His expertise also includes benchmarking of innovation systems and evaluating collaboration of the private sector with universities and government research laboratories. He is a former Principal Research Associate with the Innovation and Technology program and Manager, Innovation Council at The Conference Board of Canada. He resides in Ottawa.

 

Jeremy Hall, D.Phil.

Jeremy is an Associate Professor at the School of Business Administration, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. who specializes in technology and innovation management, corporate strategy and strategies for sustainable development.

 

Jerry Lemmon, B.Sc., P.Biol.P.Ag.

Jerry is the President of Razorquest inc., consulting to organizations focused on growth and increasing their position in today’s competitive marketplace. Razorquest services include investor readiness, growth strategy, executive mentorship and organizational transformation.  Mr. Lemmon has a diversified background, consulting to corporations on executive management and corporate leadership as a Director at the Banff Centre for Management. He has also held the position of Director, Advanced Technology Centre for The University College of the Cariboo where his main focus was business incubation, and evaluating technology and its commercial viability.  Prior to accepting his role at The Banff Centre, Mr. Lemmon was a Marketing Manager with Monsanto Canada Inc.  Mr. Lemmon is also a Fellow with THECIS (The Centre for Innovation Studies), where he contributes regularly to the advancement of innovation and technology commercialization in Alberta.

  

Les Bowd, MBA, DBA

Les has held senior positions in the public and private sector, including Assistant Deputy Minister of Agriculture for Saskatchewan and Director of Strategic Change/Planning for Agrium Inc. As Director, Executive Development at the Calgary Centre for Executive Education, Faculty of Management, University of Calgary his current research focuses on the strategic roles of middle managers.

 

Lloyd Steier

Lloyd is a professor in Strategic Management & Organization at the University of Alberta School of Business. He is also Academic Director for the Centre for Entrepreneurship and Family Enterprise. His research interests include new venture creation, technology commercialization, venture capital finance and family enterprise.

 

Marc Godin, P.Eng., MBA.

Marc has 25 years of technical and business development experience in the chemicals and energy industries and consults for corporate and government clients.

 

Martha Burkle, Ph.D.

Martha is the CISCO Research Chair in e-learning at SAIT Polytechnic. A pioneer in the research field of the use of technologies for development, her research work examines the use of technologies in the knowledge economy. After completing her PhD on Technology Policies and Higher Education at the University of Sussex, Dr. Burkle moved to Mexico where she was Associate Professor at the Monterrey Institute of Technologies University. In 2006 she moved to Calgary and assumed the CISCO Research Chair position at SAIT, where she has been doing research on the impact of information technologies in teaching and learning. Her research interests include the use of mobile technologies in just in time training, the use of Second Life to facilitate hands on learning, and students e-readiness in Canada. She is  Board member for a number of higher education institutions and editorial boards, and author of a number of research papers, case studies and research reports and has presented her research at conferences around the world.

 

Michael Lounsbury, Ph.D.

Michael  is Associate Professor in the School of Business at the University of Alberta. Professor Lounsbury’s research has a general focus on the relationship between organizational and institutional change, technological and entrepreneurial dynamics, and the emergence of new industries and practices.  He studies topics such as technology, entrepreneurship and professionalism in varied contexts such as the fields of technology transfer, solid waste, and finance.  As a research officer at the Canadian National Institute for Nanotechnology, he is currently investigating the co-evolution of nanoscience and nanotechnology.  Professor Lounsbury serves on a number of editorial boards and his work has been published in top tier peer-reviewed journals such as Administrative Science Quarterly, Academy of Management Journal, Academy of Management Review, Strategic Management Journal, and Organization Studies. In addition, he is the series editor of Research in the Sociology of Organizations published by JAI/Elsevier and co-executive editor of Journal of Management Inquiry published by Sage.  At the University of Alberta, he is the Coordinator of the Technology Commercialization Specialization and Director of the Technology Commercialization Centre (TCC).

 

Murray Wolfe, B.Comm., C.A.

Murray is Director of Internal Audit at Fortis Alberta. He specializes in the design and implementation of effective risk, internal control and governance practices.


Paul Clark

Paul is President of VisionGain Consulting. Prior to this he was Vice-President, Research and Technology at NOVA Chemicals, with a diverse career in the chemical industry in Canada and the United States. He is also a Board Member of ASRA [Alberta Research and Technology Authority] and the National Research Council of Canada and  Chair of the ASRA Task Force on Sustainability/Capacity to Innovate, and  a Member of the Judging Panel, Alberta Science and Technology  [ASTech Awards] Awards. He has also held positions as Chair of the Canadian Plastics Industry Association [CPIA];  Chair of the Innovation Management Association of Canada [IMAC]; Member, University of Waterloo Advisory Council; Member, Engineering Associates Committee, University of Calgary.

 

Patrick Feng, B.Arts Sci, M.S.,Ph.D.

Patrick was an assistant professor in the Faculty of Communication and Culture at the University of Calgary. Prior to moving to Calgary he held a postdoctoral fellow in the School of Communication Simon Fraser University. His research focuses on the social implications of new technologies, and in particular on the politics of designing and implementing technical standards. He has investigated the work of international standards organizations in developing scientific and technical standards for information technologies and health technologies. He also done work in the area of science and technology policy, and is particularly interested in how ordinary citizens at could be better represented in scientific and technological policy-making.

 

Peter Josty, Ph.D., M.B.A.

Peter has more than 25 years industrial experience in research, marketing, technical management, new application development, new business development and strategic planning.  He is Executive Director of THECIS.

 

Peter W.B. Phillips, Ph.D.

Peter is a Professor and NSERC/SSHRC Chair in managing Knowledge-based Agri-food Development at the University of Saskatchewan. His research concentrates on intellectual property management for agricultural biotechnology, trade and marketing issues relating to GM foods and development strategies. He is also Director of the U. of S. College of Biotechnology, a member of the Canadian Biotechnology Advisory Committee, senior research associate with the Estey Centre for Law and Economics in International Trade and co-principle investigator for Genome Prairie’s $3.3 million, 4 -year Genomics, Ethics, law and Society Project.

 

Rob Beamish

Rob is currently the founder and President od Ellipsis Ventures, a management consulting firm that specializes in technology commercialization in the ICT, CleanTech and healthcare sectors. As part of his practice, Rob holds the position of Director of the EnviroTech Solutions program at ClimateChange Central.

Rob’s passion for entrepreneurship and developing new business is evident in his previous roles. In addition to founding Ellipsis Ventures and Stratavera Partners, he is also helping to start a few early stage technology firms. In the past, Rob has served as Vice-President, Operations with Calgary Technologies inc. and has worked with TransCanada in various technology development roles.
Rob is a Professional Engineer with a civil engineering degree and an MBA from Queens University as well as a Masters in Environmental Design from the University of Calgary.

 

Scott Tiffin, Ph.D. 

Scott is an expert on the management of innovation and entrepreneurship in clusters and strategy for knowledge-based organizations working in international markets. He has experience with consulting, university research and teaching, postdoctoral mentoring, international research consortia, government policy and the setting up of entrepreneurial firms, in a variety of settings including Canada, the US, Europe, Middle East, Africa and Latin America. Originally an engineer, and then with a brief period in environmental science, his doctorate is in technology management and policy, from Université de Montréal.


Stelvia Matos, B. Eng. Chemical Engineering, M. Eng. and DPhil. Civil Engineering (University of São Paulo- Brazil)

Stelvia is a Research Associate in the Institute for Sustainable Energy, Environment and Economy (ISEEE) and in the faculty of Communication and Culture, University of Calgary. She also holds a Post-doctoral Research Fellowship of the International Institute for Resource Industries and Sustainability Studies (IRIS) at the Haskayne School of Business, University of Calgary. Her research interests include sustainable development innovation, information and communication technologies in rural areas, environment management tools, life cycle assessment, risk analysis and social aspects of innovation dynamics.  She has conducted research in the agriculture, aquaculture, chemical, energy, forestry and tourism sectors, with field studies performed in Brazil, Bosnia, Canada, China, Italy, the Netherlands, the UK, and the US.

 

Sylvan Katz, Ph.D.

Sylvan is a consultant in Saskatoon (Katz Competitive Intelligence Ltd.) and a Senior Research Fellow at SPRU, University of Sussex, UK. (http://www.sussex.ac.uk/spru/jskatz) His research focuses on scale-dependent and scale-independent science, technology and innovation indicators, technical competitive intelligence, foresight and self-organizing innovation activities. Currently he is working with a consortium of researchers from four European universities to develop web-based indicators of science, technology and innovation research (http://www.webindicators.org)

 

Tony Briggs, DBA., MBA, MS

Anthony is an Assistant Professor in the Strategic Management and Organization Department at the Alberta School of Business.  Tony holds a Doctor of Business Administration in Information Systems from Boston University’s Graduate School of Management where he studied how some of the world’s top technology entrepreneurs identify and develop breakthrough innovations. Prior to his doctorate, Tony received an M.S. from MIT Sloan, where he researched the impact of patent constraints on innovation, and also assisted in the design of the Intellectual Property Owners Association and the Licensing Executives Society surveys. He also holds an MBA in Finance from University of British Columbia, and a B.Sc. Hons. in Biochemistry from the University of Alberta.

Tony was a patent licensing officer in Canada and the US, most recently at Harvard Medical School, and has consulted with numerous U.S. SBIR grant companies on patent licensing and technology strategy. His research examines how highly novel information is shared and assessed in uncertain environments. He conducts related work on problems of uncertain property rights and patents.


“My Wish for Canada 150 – One Canada Again!”

31, August, 2017 – BLOG #10

CANADA 150 EDITORIAL  – By Guest Les Bowd

”  MY WISH FOR CANADA 150 – ONE CANADA AGAIN !!”

In 1967, 20 million Canadians embraced and participated in their 100th Anniversary enthusiastically. The stirring strains of Bobby Gimby’s “C-A-N-A-D-A” or Woody Guthrie’s rendition of the Canadian version of “This Land is your Land”, euphoria generated by the new Canadian flag, and the global reception of Expo ’67 in Montreal, all contributed to the pride felt for our country and its place in the world.

Much has changed in 50 years. Now a nation of almost 35 million, multi national and cultural people. with a Constitution repatriated in 1982. Global trade supports a relatively vibrant economy. Financial discipline saved us from the worst impact of the market melt-down. Canadians are seen as “nice people” with a high quality of life.

However, there is much that we could do to make this country a great one globally. In our efforts to advance across many fronts we seem to have inadvertently slipped backwards. If we are to become “One Canada Again “we need to ensure our path towards Canada 200 is positive. We must pay immediate attention to key areas that affect our ability to go forward together.

Trade, Education, Health, the Economy, Canadian Citizenship and Identity, a Renewed Constitution, and a Return to Political Civility all need to be addressed.

Our nation is a world leader in establishing global trade arrangements. Yet we cannot trade / sell a bottle of beer across many provincial boundaries. Every Canadian should be able to sell or buy goods and services anywhere in Canada.

Canadian students should be free to attend college or university across the country. Admission should be based on ability not geography. A national effort t is required to equalize tuition and residence fees across the country.

We take pride in our “universal health care system”. But, increasing inter-provincial restrictions make it difficult for Canadians to obtain health services wherever they are in the country. Further, different funding mechanisms in provinces, place many Canadians at a fiscal disadvantage. Establishing one “Canada Heath Card” entitling all to free access to medical services across the country is urgently required.

Inter-provincial economic competition is extremely dangerous. Initiatives taken to attract businesses, through tax breaks and other incentives, are undertaken haphazardly across the country by municipal, provincial and Federal national governments. The time has come to collaborate on the development and execution of a comprehensive, consensual national economic strategy.

We should relish the diversity of national origins, cultures and religions. Honouring the traditions and cultures of our First Nations should also be front of mind. The language and cultural of our two founding nations should be enshrined in any renewed Constitution However, to build a “One Canada “philosophy, we need to assert we are all “Canadians First” This will allow us to develop an integrated national perspective to the benefit of all Canadians.

Some may suggest this is a too idealistic vision of what Canada can be. To achieve this we must consider seriously the development of a totally different National Constitution. What was appropriate in 1867, does not fit the 21st century Canada. Although the 1982 Constitution repatriation did modernize Federal and Provincial responsibilities, it also reinforced the provincial powers that have contributed to disparity. We must be prepared to question whether the current structure of Canadian federalism fits our future. needs.

To achieve this ambitious goal, one additional major change must occur. Political actors must commit to return political civility to our democratic institutions. Having almost destroyed any concepts of integrity, truth, shared consultation and mutual respect in the political processes across the country, and fostered deep public cynicism towards politicians and the institutions in which they work, they must work vigorously to reverse this situation. Politicians used to cooperate to resolve issues affecting Canadians. Now such help is usually associated with political contributions and influence.

Moving into the future our political leaders must be able to set mew direction and have Canadians follow with confidence. A good start would be to enact legislation banning any form of negative advertising in elections at all levels across the country.

Many countries around the world are struggling to redefine their national and global purpose. However, Canada is poised to provide a glowing example of how we should move forward into the middle of the 21st Century and travel the road to Canada 200. But, we must do it together as “One Canada – Again!”

 

Les Bowd

THECIS Board and Fellow

THECIS logo Integrity, Indepencence, Quality

THECIS Governance Structure

Incorporated: June 15th 2001 under section 9 of the Alberta Companies Act [Not for profit section] as a company limited by guarantee.

Members

The Members play a role analogous to shareholders in a for profit company. They represent the broadest constituency for THECIS activities.  The Articles of Association limit the number of members to 50. An Annual general meeting must be held at least every 16 months; a quorum is 50% of the members.  Members are appointed by a simple majority vote of the members.  The major responsibility of the members is: to elect Directors; to appoint auditors; to fix remuneration of auditors.

 

Board of Directors

The Directors provide governance to the organization, represent THECIS to the community and accept the ultimate legal authority and fiduciary responsibility for THEICS. Directors serve a one year term that may be renewed.  The Articles state there should be 3 – 20 Directors.  The composition of the Board is determined by the Articles of Association so as to ensure participation from business, government and university.  The Chair must be from industry.

 

Executive Director

the position has primary leadership responsibility for establishing THECIS  as a significant player in Alberta and western Canada as it evolves from a volunteer to a professional organization.

THECIS Associates

THECIS Associates carry out the work of THECIS.  They include: THECIS Fellows; Executive Secretary, comptroller; Conference Planner; Accountant, Newsletter/Blog Editor; etc.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


THECIS logo Integrity, Indepencence, Quality

Backgrounder on THECIS

THECIS (The Centre for Innovation Studies) is a province-wide not for profit organization devoted to study and promotion of innovation.  Based in Calgary, Alberta, and Incorporated in 2001, its primary geographic scope is western Canada.
THECIS has three core functions – research, networking and education.
  • Research. Creating new knowledge and building insights into how the innovation systems functions and policies that can improve it.
  • Networking.  Providing opportunities for exchange of ideas through breakfast meetings, workshops and conferences.
  • Education.  Dissemination of information through Blogs/Newsletters, events and other informal education activities, particularly for graduate students.

Funding.  THECIS is funded on a project basis by a variety of organizations.  since 2001, nearly 50 organizations have provided financial support to THECIS.

THECIS is governed by a Board of Directors from across Alberta, with extensive experience and knowledge relating to innovation.

Executive leadership is provided by an Executive Director, and projects are carried out for clients by a network of experienced individuals called THECIS Fellows.  The THECIS Fellows represent a major asset and a major source of competitive advantage for THECIS.

The Core Values of THECIS are integrity, independence and quality.